A letter to our friends in the RV community about Coronavirus

March 11, 2020

First, this is a serious post, not a marketing one, and probably just one of two or three we have done like this in our 20 year history. While we supply WiFi products to the RV community, this is not a promotional post and you won’t find any coupon codes or product links today.

We consider many of our customers to be friends and family, and we at Rokland extend our thoughts to those who may already be experiencing the direct impact of the Coronavirus. The World Health Organization declared it a pandemic today, and we recommend visiting Coronavirus.gov for detailed information about the disease and how to prevent the spread.

Beyond that, we wish to discuss what’s ahead, especially for the large RV and recreational community that supports us here at Rokland Technologies and with whom we do a lot of business.

The bad news is that the median age in our RV lifestyle community is above 55, which means we are at more risk than the rest of the population for Coronavirus and are more likely to face severe effects if we get it. So we have to take it seriously.

The good news is RV parks are not the type of large gatherings with people in close proximity that the government is concerned about right now. In fact, getting out in our RV somewhat isolated from others could be a good way to keep yourself away from the virus while still enjoying life. Obviously, there are no guarantees no matter what you do, but here are some suggestions to our friends already in RV parks, or those planning to venture to one soon. They are probably things you thought of already, but this could be a good reminder:

1. Stay away from public areas of the RV park. This may not be the best time to hit the swimming pool or common areas of the park where the virus could easily spread. Stay in or around your RV and in more natural surroundings like the riverside until more is known about the spread of the virus. If you do visit common areas, bring hand sanitizer with you, and wash your hands thoroughly upon returning to your RV. This is also good advice after fueling while on the road.
 
2. Control who has access to your RV. One positive to being out in the RV is you can control who is around you. If you have friends in the park, or family close by, meet them away from your RV to avoid contamination.
 
3. Avoid handshakes and other physical contact. It’s almost a reflex for many of us. A good stern handshake or friendly hug is how we say hello to new neighbors, or goodbye to those we are leaving. But physical contact is known to spread the virus. A friendly wave or a tip of the cap is a good substitute.
 
4. Don’t necessarily rush to the ER if you feel sick. We are not medical professionals and are just sharing advice from the medical community here. While you need to use your own judgement, feeling ill may mean you just have a traditional cold or allergies. Visit a local urgent care center, or visit the CDC web site above to find out who may have Coronavirus test kits near you if you do feel you need to be tested. But the one thing you should not do is wait for the illness to pass while carrying on as usual. If you are infected with the virus, you could be putting everyone around you at risk.

We hope you have fun this spring and summer, but extra caution is in order. Unless otherwise suggested by the medical community, you don’t need to stay home, but it is a good idea to take extra precautions. We wish all of you good health and a happy time out in your RV.

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